Intimate Partner Violence/Family Violence

Family Violence from an Intercultural Perspective
Holtmann, Catherine. (2016, April1 5). Family Violence from an Intercultural Perspective. [Webinar]. Retrieved from http://www.casw-acts.ca/en/family-violence-intercultural-perspective 
This webinar focuses on the latest research concerning family violence and abuse amongst the immigrant community in Canada. Research with Canadian immigrant women reveals there are problems with how “family violence” is defined. This webinar also highlights structural barriers that immigrant women face in situations of family violence.
Themes: IPV, immigrant women, systemic barriers for immigrant women in situations of family violence, including immigrant women in a collaborative response to family violence

Family Violence Prevention: Building Trauma-informed Communities
Fisher, Art., & Macdonald N. (2015, February 26). Family Violence Prevention: Building Trauma-Informed Communities. [Webinar]. Retrieved from http://www.novascotiatraumainformednetwork.org/2015/01/02/preventing-family-violence-by-building-trauma-informed-community-practices-prince-edward-island-may-28-and-29-2014/#.WBI4DS0rKUk
This webinar provides participants with a deeper understanding of how both historical and ongoing violence impacts people’s lives. Trauma is explored on different levels including personal, interpersonal, and systems/structural levels. 
Themes: trauma informed prevention philosophy, trauma-informed prevention and intervention, breaking the cycle, violence-informed, systems violence and on-going colonization

Family Violence through a Trauma-Informed Approach
Arsenault, Rina. (2016, January 29). Family Violence through a Trauma-Informed Approach [Webinar]. Retrieved from http://www.casw-acts.ca/en/family-violence-through-trauma-informed-approach
This presentation highlights the importance of integrating knowledge on trauma into policies, processes, and practices, known as a “trauma-informed approach.” This is important as individuals have different behaviours to cope with the emotional, psychological, and physical pain of violence.
Themes: IPV, Power & Control, trauma-informed, trauma-informed responses, attachment, IPV on victims, IPV effects, making the links, outcomes, trauma-informed community-based care vs trauma-specific therapy, triggers

Principles of Trauma-informed approaches to child sexual abuse: A discussion paper
Quadara, A. and Hunter, C. 2016, Principles of Trauma-informed approaches to child sexual abuse: A discussion paper, Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, Sydney.
This paper examines the rise of trauma-informed care in international and Australian service contexts. Although common principles of trauma-informed care exist, there is a lack of consensus around certain aspects leaving the term “trauma-informed care” open to multiple interpretations. The overall aim of this paper is to provide clarifications on these gaps based on available research literature and critical analysis.

Stress management and health promotion in a sample of women with intimate partner violence a randomized controlled trial
Kokka, A., Mikelatou, M., Fouka, G., Varvogli, L., Chrousos, G. P., & Darviri, C. (2016). Stress management and health promotion in a sample of women with intimate partner violence: a randomized controlled trial [Abstract]. Journal of Interpersonal Violence. doi:https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260516658759
Abstract from article:
“The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of a stress management program regarding mitigating psychological repercussions in women who experience intimate partner violence (IPV). This randomized controlled trial took place from January 2015 to June 2015, in Attica, Greece. A total of 60 women were randomly assigned into an intervention and control group, with the intervention group (n = 30) receiving stress management and a lifestyle program. Self-reported measures were used to assess stress, depression and anxiety levels, daily routine, severity of abuse, self-esteem, health locus of control, and self-efficacy. Statistical analysis showed a significant improvement in measures of stress, depression, anxiety, self-esteem, and self-efficacy in the intervention group. Daily routine and physical exercise also improved. Based on these findings, we strongly encourage health professionals to advise women experiencing current and past IPV to adopt stress management techniques to their daily program, as a further means of empowerment.”

Trauma-Informed Approaches for LGBQT* Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence: A Review of Literature and a Set of Practice Observations
The GLBTQ Domestic Violence Project. (June 2016). Trauma-Informed Approaches for LGBQT* Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence: A Review of Literature and a Set of Practice Observations. Boston, MA: Curt Rogers.
Currently, there are few, if any documented LGBQT*-specific models of trauma-informed practice. This literature review explores trauma-informed practice and a set of practice observations for LGBQT* communities. This document is useful for those in domestic and sexual violence organizations as well as practitioners in other anti-violence disciplines, homelessness services, mental health and health care services, criminal legal systems, and more.

Vulnerability to intimate partner violence and poor mental health in the first 4-year postpartum among mothers reporting childhood abuse: an Australian pregnancy cohort study
Gartland, D., Woolhouse, H., Giallo, R., McDonald, E., Hegarty, K., Mensah, F., . . . Brown, S. J. (2016). Vulnerability to intimate partner violence and poor mental health in the first 4-year postpartum among mothers reporting childhood abuse: an Australian pregnancy cohort study [Abstract]. Archives of Women's Mental Health, 19(6), 1091-1100. doi:10.1007/s00737-016-0659-8
Abstract from article: “The purpose of this study was to investigate intergenerational patterns of abuse and trauma and the health consequences for women in the early childbearing years. A prospective pregnancy cohort of 1507 nulliparous women (≦24 weeks gestation) were recruited in Melbourne, Australia, 2003–2005. Follow-up was scheduled in late pregnancy, 3-, 6- and 12-month and 4-year postpartum. Childhood abuse was retrospectively reported at 4-year postpartum using the Child Maltreatment History Self Report. Intimate partner violence (IPV) was assessed at 1- and 4-year postpartum with the Composite Abuse Scale. Maternal depressive symptoms were assessed in all follow-ups using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine associations between childhood abuse, maternal mental health and IPV. Childhood abuse was reported by 41.1 % of women. In the 4 years after having their first child, 28.2 % of women reported IPV, 25.2 % depression and 31.6 % anxiety. Childhood abuse was associated with odds of depression or anxiety 1.5–2.6 times greater and 1.8–3.2 times greater for IPV. Childhood physical abuse remained significantly associated with depression and anxiety in pregnancy and postpartum after adjusting for IPV and stressful life events, while sexual abuse remained significantly associated only with anxiety. Women who begin childbearing with a history of childhood abuse are more vulnerable to IPV and poor mental health. All health care services and agencies in contact with children, young people and families should have adequate training to identify trauma associated with abuse and IPV and provide first line supportive care and referral.”